Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

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Heritage/Tradition

A sketch of the Michigan Union by Vernon Howe Bailey, 1917. (Courtesy of U-M's Bentley Historical Library.)

200 years and counting

VIDEO

U-M’s bicentennial is upon us. What better time to celebrate the legacies and achievements that make Michigan what it is?

Brothers Nicholas and Leonard Falcone. (Image courtesy of the Michigan State University Archives and Historical Collection.)

Brothers of band

In the 1920s, brothers Nicholas and Leonard Falcone played opposite sides of the field as rival directors of the Michigan and Michigan State marching bands.

Union soldiers in training, Bentley Historical Library

The boys of ’61

In 1861, the crisis of southern secession turned Michigan’s campus into a cauldron of pro-Union meetings and military drills as students prepared to exchange books for weapons.

[L-R: UM Ath. Director Fielding Yost, UM President C.C. Little, Michigan Governor Fred Green, OSU Ath. Dir. L.W. St. John, Ohio Governor Vic Donahey]

Pigskins and presidents

U-M’s chief executives haven’t all been fans of our beloved Wolverines, though President C.C. Little (second from right) enjoyed the Big House dedication in 1927.

Carillon bell at U-M

There were bells

VIDEO

The carillon bells in Burton Tower have been tolling for 80 years, but they are only the latest in an astonishingly varied series of bells and chimes making music at U-M.

Typical fresh-soph hijinks.

The great suspension

In 1874, fresh-soph warfare finally got so out of hand that Michigan’s faculty suspended nearly 10 percent of male students.