Research News

  1. Why dishing does you good

    How come dishing with a girlfriend does wonders for a woman’s mood?

  2. What to expect of the flu

    H1N1 (swine) flu isn’t gone yet. Here are tips from U-M’s health system for dealing with it when flu season starts again in the fall.

  3. Chemicals in common consumer products may play a role in pre-term births

    A group of common environmental contaminants called phthalates, which are present in many industrial and consumer products including everyday personal care items, may contribute to the country’s alarming rise in premature births.

  4. U.S. seniors 'smarter' than their English peers

    A study of nearly 14,000 U.S. and English seniors shows that 75-year-olds in the U.S. have memories as good, on average, as 65-year-olds in England.

  5. Students create portable device to detect suicide bombers

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are a major cause of soldier casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan. A group of U-M students won a contest against Ohio State University by developing a new way to detect IEDs—one that is more effective than any currently in use.

  6. Fossil of primate ancestor discovered

    U-M’s Philip Gingerich and Holly Smith are members of an international scientific team that recently announced discovery of a remarkably complete, well-preserved 47-million-year old fossil of an extinct early primate. The fossil is thought to represent an early member of the lineage that gave rise to monkeys, apes and humans.

  7. U-M students chasing tornadoes

    Six U-M students are part of a group of almost 100 scientists in 40 vehicles who are traversing tornado alley this summer in the largest joint effort ever to study twisters and supercell thunderstorms.

    Related: Read the students’ on-the-ground blog.

  8. Choosing the correct athletic shoes

    A U-M expert’s advice for comfort, performance and injury prevention.

  9. Climate change driving Michigan mammals north

    Some Michigan mammal species are rapidly expanding their ranges northward, apparently in response to climate change, a new study shows. In the process, these historically southern species are replacing their northern counterparts.