Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Innovation

  1. Snails help solve mystery with world’s smallest computer

    U-M scientists using a computing system so tiny it can stick to a snail’s shell recently collected data ‘that nobody had been able to obtain’ before. Evolutionary biologists are using the miniaturized sensing computers to understand how to preserve and protect endemic species.

  2. Good science changes: That’s a good thing

    Throughout history, the process of discovery has always involved correcting mistakes, clarifying our understanding, and adding deeper shades of nuance. These changes in our knowledge are features of science, not bugs.

  3. Trapping ocean microplastics

    Some 8 million tons of plastic trash enter the ocean each year, most of which is battered into microplastics. U-M researchers can now spot these harmful flecks, tracking where they enter the water, how they move, and where they tend to collect around the world.

  4. ‘A student I knew well was getting skinnier before my eyes’

    Transplant surgeon Michael Englesbe assumed anxiety was causing his research associate’s weight loss. But it was poverty. So he enlisted a crew to create the Shield Fund to support struggling medical students.

  5. Toddler with spina bifida meets paralympian: “She has crutches like me”

    A young patient’s reaction to a commercial featuring gold medalist and double amputee Jessica Long goes viral, leads to a Zoom introduction.

  6. Patient rounds get a technical upgrade

    Out of crisis comes opportunity — and with COVID-19 derailing traditional hospital rounds, U-M researchers have found a way to bring caregivers safely to the bedside.

  7. Choose your own adventure

    Experience an earthquake, frolic on Mars, and chase a robot up the stairs. It’s just another dazzling day at U-M’s Ford Motor Company Robotics Building, now open for mind-bending business.

  8. Sticking the landing on Mars: High-powered computing reduces guesswork

    NASA’s Mars Perseverance Rover touched down on the Red Planet’s surface Feb. 18. U-M’s Jesse Capecelatro has been working with NASA to better understand what happens during landings when surface particles are stirred up.

  9. How to make the robot revolution serve the people

    The Ford Robotics Building, at $75 million and 140,000 square feet, is set to open soon. Features include an indoor fly zone for autonomous aerial vehicles, an outdoor playground for walking robots, a high-bay garage for self-driving cars, and more.