Law & Politics

  1. Coming home: A Vietnam Veteran in the Law School

    With a West Point diploma and two Purple Hearts, Tom Carhart, JD ’72, arrived on the Law Quad at the height of the anti-Vietnam War movement. At first, Carhart was appalled by the student protests. Soon, he joined in.

  2. From indigenous student to endowed professor

    ‘I kept my head down,’ says Matthew Fletcher, BA ’94/JD ’97, of the culture shock he endured at U-M while pursuing his boyhood ambition of becoming a lawyer. This fall, the Native American legal scholar and tribal court chief justice returned to Michigan as a distinguished law professor.

  3. U-M teach-out Aug. 18: What’s next for abortion access?

    Experts on abortion access and legal challenges present a free, online teach-out to help foster thoughtful discourse on the issue of abortion, its history of litigation, and what could be expected in the aftermath of the Supreme Court ruling.

  4. The action was affirmative

    Roger Wilkins, BA ’53/JD ’56/HLHD ’93, was a civil rights activist, professor, journalist, and member of the LBJ administration. But as a U-M student, this future leader’s grades were unimpressive, so he asked why he’d been admitted to the Law School. The answer surprised him.

  5. Protests in Cuba: The beginning of a new revolution?

    U-M sociologist Silvia Pedraza says Cuban unrest is the result of a perfect storm that includes the coronavirus pandemic, the lack of a charismatic leader, the deep financial crisis unleashed by changes in the currency, and greater access to the internet in recent years.

  6. Two-thirds of local leaders see Michigan moving in the wrong direction

    The combined crises of the past year have darkened the attitudes of local government leaders, according to the first results of U-M’s 2021 Michigan Public Policy Survey.

  7. Forecast 2021: Presidential politics

    As a new presidential administration gets to work, U-M experts explore the myriad crises that Joe Biden and his team face, from a lack of trust in government to the relentless COVID-19 pandemic.

  8. ‘My heart was shattered’

    Congressional scholars Norm Ornstein, MA ’68/PhD ’74, and Thomas Mann, MA ’68/PhD ’77, describe the dysfunction in Congress as ‘worse than it looks.’ But the Jan. 6 assault on democracy shocked even them.

  9. Satellite clerk’s office at UMMA registers thousands to vote

    The satellite city clerk’s office registers about 150-200 students per day. As of Oct. 13, more than 2,600 students registered and more than 2,900 voted in person at UMMA or by returning their ballot to the museum’s drop box.