Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Science and Technology

  1. Toward a portable concussion detector that relies on an infrared laser

    Doctors and engineers collaborate on a noninvasive way to measure whether brain cells are in distress using an infrared laser. The new device could enable concussions to be diagnosed on the sidelines of an athletic event.

  2. Producing ‘green methane’ with artificial photosynthesis

    A solar-powered catalyst uses artificial photosynthesis to turn carbon dioxide into methane. We could be recycling smokestack CO2 within 5-10 years, researchers say.

  3. ‘We’re missing something fundamental about the sun’

    First data from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission has implications for space weather prediction and Earth’s power grid.

  4. The first flu shot

    When an influenza epidemic threatened the American effort in World War II, the War Dept. drafted scientist Tommy Francis to combat the killer virus. Francis’ team at U-M developed the world’s first flu vaccine.

  5. U-M to build $300m center in Detroit

    The Detroit Center for Innovation will serve students pursuing advanced degrees in mobility, artificial intelligence, data science, and more. Construction begins in 2021.

  6. Apple and U-M collaborate on sound study

    Scientists have long grappled with measuring the impact of noise exposure on humans. U-M has partnered with Apple to use a person’s iPhone and Apple Watch to generate a more holistic overview.

  7. Cancer trap shows promise

    Researchers find that a tiny ‘decoy’ implanted just beneath the skin in mice attracts cancer cells traveling through the body. The trap even picks up signs that cancer is preparing to spread.

  8. How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide

    Russia’s grip on its citizens’ internet access has troubling implications for online freedom in the U.S. and other countries that share its decentralized network structure.

  9. A laser pointer could hack your voice-controlled virtual assistant

    Researchers identify a vulnerability in voice-controlled virtual assistants that allows a microphone to ‘unwittingly listen to light as if it were sound.’