Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Science and Technology

  1. The first flu shot

    When an influenza epidemic threatened the American effort in World War II, the War Dept. drafted scientist Tommy Francis to combat the killer virus. Francis’ team at U-M developed the world’s first flu vaccine.

  2. U-M to build $300m center in Detroit

    The Detroit Center for Innovation will serve students pursuing advanced degrees in mobility, artificial intelligence, data science, and more. Construction begins in 2021.

  3. Apple and U-M collaborate on sound study

    Scientists have long grappled with measuring the impact of noise exposure on humans. U-M has partnered with Apple to use a person’s iPhone and Apple Watch to generate a more holistic overview.

  4. Cancer trap shows promise

    Researchers find that a tiny ‘decoy’ implanted just beneath the skin in mice attracts cancer cells traveling through the body. The trap even picks up signs that cancer is preparing to spread.

  5. How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide

    Russia’s grip on its citizens’ internet access has troubling implications for online freedom in the U.S. and other countries that share its decentralized network structure.

  6. A laser pointer could hack your voice-controlled virtual assistant

    Researchers identify a vulnerability in voice-controlled virtual assistants that allows a microphone to ‘unwittingly listen to light as if it were sound.’

  7. Michigan cities, groups that will bear brunt of climate change effects

    Study shows most cities in Michigan will be dealing with harsh consequences of climate change, and vulnerable groups who are disproportionately affected by it will continue to do so now and into the future.

  8. Virtual reality

    U-M nursing students are using imaginary worlds to save actual lives, immersing in urgent and realistic scenarios that transcend traditional health-care training.

  9. Peering into biological tissue

    A light-spinning device inspired by the Japanese art of paper cutting allows U-M researchers to scan the internal structures of plant and animal tissue without X-rays