Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Science and Technology

  1. A new way to track deadly ‘superbugs’

    Using a real-world outbreak as a test case, researchers may have discovered a way to slow the spread of superbugs.

  2. Fighting cancer . . . with cancer

    Three-dimensional, lab-grown cells may one day help doctors zero in on individualized treatments for ovarian cancer.

  3. Thruster for Mars mission breaks records

    U-M engineers develop advanced space engine to propel humans to Mars; it’s breaking records for operating current, power, and thrust.

  4. This boy's life

    Donated tissue from the brain tumor of 5-year-old Chad Carr provides cancer researchers with critical clues.

  5. 'Increased-risk’ donor organs a tough sell

    The opioid epidemic has created a surge in donor organs. But despite their safety record, organs that could save lives often go unused.

  6. Bionic heart tissue?

    U-M partners on an ambitious $20-million project to grow new heart tissue for cardiac patients. Plus: Breakthroughs in leukemia and infertility treatments.

  7. Tangs for the memories

    As a scientist in the late ’60s, Rowena Matthews, PhD ’69, redefined gender norms in the lab. And that was before she hit the airwaves.

  8. Choosing untested treatments

    A federal “right-to-try” law for medical treatments could soon become reality. And U-M is poised to expand access to new options.

  9. (Fish) farm to table

    Biomedical engineer/alum creates the ‘Oasis,’ a portable mini-ecosystem ideal for people facing food insecurity.