Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Business and Economy

  1. How popular is Robin Hood, anyway?

    As global income inequality continues to rise, public policy expert Charlotte Cavaillé explores the concept of ‘fairness’ and the politics of income redistribution.

  2. Forecast 2021: Presidential politics

    As a new presidential administration gets to work, U-M experts explore the myriad crises that Joe Biden and his team face, from a lack of trust in government to the relentless COVID-19 pandemic.

  3. Paul Milgrom, BA ’70, awarded Nobel Prize

    The 2020 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences recognizes Milgrom’s work in improving auction formats. He and fellow researcher Robert Wilson were awarded the prize for their research about auction theory.

  4. More than 1.3M jobs, $82B in wages tied to Great Lakes, study shows

    The coastal counties of the eight Great Lakes states produce 21 percent of the gross domestic product in the region and 5.8 percent of the United States’ GDP.

  5. U-M counts record startups, inventions in FY20

    The University’s ‘innovation ecosystem’ launched 31 startups this fiscal year, a 40-percent increase over FY19, despite a period that included the pandemic and temporarily shuttered labs.

  6. Let’s make a deal

    Future business magnate and 1913 grad George Mason arrived at U-M with an apple in hand and a penchant for negotiation. With one transaction freshman year, he set off a chain of lucrative deals that landed him a Stutz Bearcat.

  7. Local alumni fill gaps for groceries

    Reports of wasted milk and rotting produce no longer needed by restaurants revealed Big Food’s limited ability to pivot during crisis. Meanwhile, resilient alumni who own Michigan farms and markets are tweaking business models to serve consumers.

  8. COVID-19 shocks food supply chain; spurs creativity, resiliency

    From shortages to unanticipated waste, the pandemic’s damage to the supply chain is exacerbating the problem of food insecurity for millions. Still, there are signs of hope, and they’re coming from smaller grocers and local suppliers.

  9. Wine country goes urban

    In 1701, Antoine Cadillac saw promise in the juicy, beautiful grapes lining the Detroit River. It took a while, but Detroit Vineyards has replied to the city’s founder by embracing urban viticulture. Cheers!