Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Galleries

  1. Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire

    This virtual visit to the Stamps Gallery on Division Street celebrates Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements and experimental art practices from the late-1950s to the 1970s. Materials from U-M’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Historical Library are displayed alongside radical artworks influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination.
    • Student power exhibit
    • Josh MacPhee’s second installation for the show, titled Black Power, 2018, is shown here. MacPhee is an artist, curator and activist living in Brooklyn, NY. He graduated from Oberlin College in 1996 and spent eight years as an artist and activist in Chicago, where he established a distribution system called justseeds in order get more radical art projects out to the public.
    • Jane Prophet (center), the newly appointed associate dean of research at the Stamps School of Art & Design, with her husband, David Richardson, and Stamps professor and artist Carole Jacobsen (right).
    • Artist Brendan Fernandes’ "I Am Old Enough to Know What We Lost" grieves the loss of 49 people gunned down in an Orlando nightclub in 2016. He is collaborating with U-M dance students to present the performance "Emergency Rave" on Nov. 9, at Ann Arbor's Neutral Zone.
    • Have we Met brings together archival materials and reproductions from the U-M Library’s Labadie Collection Collection of Social Protest and photographs from the U-M Bentley Historical Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.
    • Diag with PresRes at the rear, right
    • Pres Res, 1870s-80s
    • Angell-era Pres Res, 1880
    • 1890, Presidents Residence
    • Botanical gardens and library, 1900
    • Trellis at the Pres Res
  2. That’s life

    In 1947, decades before social media connected us, Life magazine shared U-M Homecoming with Wolverines worldwide.
  3. Whale of a tale

    The University of Michigan Museum of Natural History will offer interactive, "minds-on" exhibits in its new home, opening in April 2019. Till then, experts continue to carefully transport precious specimens from the Ruthven Building to the new Biological Sciences Building. Enjoy this moving experience of two such specimens. (Images by Michigan Photography, unless otherwise noted.)
  4. This is Michigan

    Boosting economic mobility. Stamping out disease. Protecting the Great Lakes. U-M creates impact far beyond the classroom, dispatching knowledge and expertise statewide that touches nearly every aspect of our lives. Check out these scenes of our work around the Mitten.
  5. Third century, first class

    Active. Experiential. Engaged. See how U-M students and faculty are transforming education as part of the University’s Third Century Initiative. In an assessment issued in June, U-M leaders reported that the initiative resulted in an institutionalization of engaged learning ideals, an extremely high percentage of students reporting the experiences at graduation, and a faculty more confident overall in using this approach to teaching. The $50 million initiative to transform teaching and scholarship at the University funded many current courses, programs, and projects.
  6. Running down a dream

    Nicole Ver Kuilen, BBA ’13, ran, biked, and swam 1,500 miles down the West coast to raise awareness for Forrest Stump, the nonprofit she founded to champion the rights of disabled people. “I’ve placed limits on myself,” says the athlete, who lost her leg to bone cancer when she was 10. “After this trip I realized: ‘No limits.’” The documentary about her journey, titled 1500 Miles, is in post-production. Support the film. (Photos courtesy of Nicole Ver Kuilen.)
  7. Look again

    Sometimes it takes the eye of a skilled artist to remind us that campus offers a trove of visual delights. These images by student photographers were submitted to the Arts at Michigan's "As I See It" photo competition.
  8. Impressions of the Michigan Union

    These images are a random collection of faces and places in time. We hope you enjoy!