Research News

  1. U-M combats residential flooding in Detroit

    The city’s aging infrastructure is no match for the severe effects of climate change. But with $1 million from the Kresge Foundation, U-M’s School for Environment and Sustainability will work with local partners to mitigate flooding and other concerns.

  2. $2M to replace fossil fuels with solar power in fertilizer production

    U-M researchers will study the effectiveness of a new ammonia production process aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Bringing the process directly to farmers could cut environmental costs by reducing transportation requirements.

  3. Energy from waste: Cow-inspired biodigesters

    A proposed energy-production system based, in part, on cow stomachs could generate 40 percent more power from municipal waste streams, at a 20 percent reduced cost — and provide a viable alternative to sending waste to landfills.

  4. Exoskeletons to assist workers, the elderly, etc.

    U-M is developing a solution for the one in eight Americans who faces a mobility disability. A $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health is funding the creation of a modular, powered exoskeleton system that could be used on one or multiple joints of the legs.

  5. Individual finger control for advanced prostheses demonstrated in primates

    In a first, a computer that could fit on an implantable device has interpreted brain signals for precise, high-speed, multifinger movements in primates. This is a key step toward giving those who have lost limb function more natural, real-time control over advanced prostheses.

  6. Communities for cognitive aging: How neighborhoods may protect the cognitive health of older Americans

    A trio of U-M studies shows that urban and suburban neighborhoods that provide opportunities for socialization, physical activity, and intellectual stimulation may help preserve older adults’ cognitive health.

  7. Solar cells with 30-year lifetimes for power-generating windows

    A new transparency-friendly solar cell design could marry high efficiencies with 30-year estimated lifetimes, which may pave the way for windows that also provide solar power. The high-efficiency but fragile molecules for converting light to electricity thrive with a little protection.

  8. Dementia’s toll on US

    U-M study shows major gaps in who gets care that could help them remain at home. Black, low-income, or people with lower levels of education are less likely than their counterparts to have available spouse caregivers, but more likely to have adult children available to provide care.

  9. Cutting through the confusion about kids, teens and COVID-19 exposures

    It’s pretty confusing to be a parent of a school-age or preschool child right now. Here is your handy guide to quarantine, isolation, and more, based on the latest science.