Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Arts & Culture

  1. Vulnerability, gravitas in quarantine docs

    Instead of earning a stranger’s trust and documenting a moment in time for their final projects, students photographed loved ones in lockdown.

  2. Otto Penzler’s nirvana of noir

    This fiction guru/publisher has spent decades curating his Mysterious Press and Mysterious Bookshop. Penzler often consults with ‘regulars’ like Stephen King and James Patterson — and he suggests these thrillers to pass the pandemic.

  3. The perils of social media and self-delusion

    ‘New Yorker’ essayist Jia Tolentino, MFA ’14, explores the ‘peculiar effects’ of self-deception, self-destruction, and the performance of identity in ‘Trick Mirror.’

  4. Episode 36: The editor and the giants, featuring Jim Tobin

    Inside the Bentley archives, ‘Michigan Today’ historian Jim Tobin reads letters, telegrams, and handwritten notes between ‘Esquire’ magazine founder Arnold Gingrich, BA ’25, and two of his quirkiest contributors: Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. If you love language, you must listen. Utterly exquisite.

  5. The accidental cartoonist grows up

    Artist-turned-author Cathy Guisewite, BA ’72, pivots from comics to prose with a collection of wry and relatable essays about the absurdities of adulthood.

  6. Strike up the band

    More than 400 U-M alums are teaching ‘more than music’ in elementary, middle, and high school music classrooms throughout Michigan.

  7. Do you believe in miracles? Valentine Davies did.

    ‘Miracle on 34th Street’ is a classic 1947 film about a man who believes he’s Santa Claus. The story came from Valentine Davies, BA ’27, who believed he could spread goodwill.

  8. Letters from Long Binh

    Greg Stern, BA ’00, regrets he never asked his late father about his service in Vietnam. Then the filmmaker found a family treasure that turned into documentary gold.

  9. Episode 32: The band plays on, feat. John Pasquale

    The world may be rife with chaos, but one thing never changes: When football fans enter the Big House, the Michigan Marching Band will deliver a performance unrivaled by any competition.