Arts & Culture

  1. Remembering LGBTQ+ pioneer, Spectrum Center co-founder Jim Toy

    Toy was a fierce champion for human rights, and in 1971 helped establish U-M’s Human Sexuality Office — later becoming the Spectrum Center — the country’s first campus office dedicated to supporting LGBTQ+ students. He was 91.

  2. Bookstore blends culture, community in Flint

    The Comma Bookstore & Social Hub is a rarity: Fewer than 6 percent of U.S. bookstores are owned and operated by Black entrepreneurs. Egypt Otis, BA ’20, is here to change that.

  3. Student journalists redefine a rivalry

    Student-athletes are not the only ones who thrive on the high-level competition yielded by an annual rivalry. Aspiring journalists at U-M and OSU debuted their ‘Rivalry Edition’ three years ago as a newsroom fundraiser, ending on game day, Nov. 27.

  4. Career quandary: Engineering or opera?

    Sebastian Catana, BSE’95, was close to completing a doctorate in chemical engineering when he made the life-changing decision to pursue a career in opera. Wonder if audiences in Italy’s Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova know that ‘Pagliacci’s’ Tonio is a would-be scientist.

  5. It’s all there in black & white

    COVID-19 lockdown was not an option for producer/photographer Robin Fader, BA ’78. Based in Washington, D.C., she is one of three artists (along with colleagues in NYC and Boston) who spent a year documenting our fractured society for the book ‘2020 UNMASKED.’

  6. Gather and sift

    The true tale of George Koval, ‘the atomic spy in America who got away,’ makes for enthralling narrative nonfiction in the hands of a gifted writer. Learn how author/journalist Ann Hagedorn, MLIS ’75, transformed mountains of research about this ‘hero of the Russian Federation’ into a compelling page-turner.

  7. Joe Levickas exhibits impactful art on a small scale

    When the pandemic shut down his options for curating art, this painter created a “micro” exhibition space in front of his home. The Creal Microgallery debuted in June, complete with interior lights so visitors could enjoy it in the evening as well.

  8. Michigan Marching Band’s illuminated 9/11 tribute wows fans at Michigan Stadium

    The emotional performance included lasers, glowing orbs, high-powered flashlights, and more, as performers created memorable formations of the World Trade Center’s twin towers, an outline of the United States, and an American Flag.

  9. U-M’s David Turnley releases never-before-seen photos of 9/11

    A new photographic documentary by the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and professor offers close-up encounters of the moments before both of the World Trade Center towers fell, and the immediate aftermath.