Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Athletics

  1. Fumbles, flubs, clangers, and fluffs

    Why do top performers often fall short of the mark when the stakes are high and the pressure is on? A U-M psychologist explains.

  2. Gymnasts advocate for athletes’ mental health

    When the careers of Big Ten champs Polina Shchennikova and Sam Roy were cut short, they confronted a tough emotional transition. Now, as student assistant coaches, they have a new mission.

  3. Like father, like son

    Wolverines defensive lineman Aidan Hutchinson is chasing a dream. It’s the same one his father, Chris Hutchinson, chased as a dominating All-American defensive lineman for U-M from 1988-92.

  4. Student-athlete: Oxymoron?

    It depends on where you look, writes sportswriter John U. Bacon, ’86/’94, in this excerpt from his new book, ‘Overtime.’ The author examines Jim Harbaugh’s impact on Michigan football as an athlete and a coach.

  5. Rushing the desert, storming a mountain

    Obsessed with the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team? A new book by professor Andrei Markovits recounts the ‘different roads to shared glory’ taken by the sport’s most promising female athletes in the U.S. and Europe.

  6. Bakich: D1Baseball Coach of the Year

    In his seventh season at the helm of Michigan baseball, Erik Bakich guided the Wolverines to their eighth College World Series in team history, and a national runner-up finish. Plus: Post-season highlights!

  7. A most valuable player

    Catcher Moe Berg may have been the ‘greatest gloveman’ in the MLB. But he also was a secret agent in World War II. ‘The Spy Behind Home Plate’ is a new documentary from Michigan Daily alumna Aviva Kempner, BA ’69/MUP ’71.

  8. Welcome home, Head Coach Juwan Howard

    Mgoblue.com follows former Michigan great Juwan Howard on his emotional return to Ann Arbor as men’s basketball head coach.

  9. Bill Freehan: Legend and legacy

    The esteemed athlete’s story is all about faith and love, says mgoblue.com’s Steve Kornacki. In 1968, Freehan, ’66, helped Detroit win the World Series; today he is battling Alzheimer’s.