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Research News

  1. Schools, parents should use summer to prepare their K-12 students for fall in-person classes

    Now that many schools nationwide have announced plans to hold in-person sessions this fall, questions have been raised about what’s next for students who spent much of the last year learning virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic. A U-M expert seeks to answer them.

  2. Anti-Asian hate: U-M chronicles location, nature of more than 1,000 incidents last year

    The Virulent Hate Project, which is supported by U-M’s Center for Social Solutions and Poverty Solutions initiative, reviewed 4,337 news articles from 2020 that addressed coronavirus-related, anti-Asian racism in the United States.

  3. 5 ways to reset your relationship with screens

    After months of virtual activities being the norm, how can parents wean their children and families off screens this summer? Get some advice from one of U-M’s top experts.

  4. Researchers predict COVID baby boom

    Reports of a possible COVID baby boom have appeared in the media, but with little data to support predictions. Now a model projects a 10- to 15-percent increase in births over what would normally be expected in the summer and fall of 2021.

  5. 17-year cicadas and tree damage: What to expect

    The cicadas can damage small trees and shrubs so the best defense is to cover vulnerable or smaller trees with mesh or netting; insecticides should not be used, experts say.

  6. Biologist eagerly awaits cicada song

    After developing underground for 17 years, the buzzing, bug-eyed horde of cicadas known as Brood X is expected to emerge by the billions in May across southeastern Michigan and other eastern states. Let’s sing!

  7. The suicide rate among female nurses is shocking

    The 3 million nurses working in the U.S. today comprise the country’s largest health-care workforce — 85 percent of whom are women. They are twice as likely to die by suicide than the general female population, and 70 percent more likely than female physicians.

  8. People gave up on flu pandemic measures a century ago – and paid a price

    The deadly third wave of the 1918 flu shows what can happen when society prematurely returns to pre-pandemic life, a medical historian cautions.

  9. Patient rounds get a technical upgrade

    Out of crisis comes opportunity — and with COVID-19 derailing traditional hospital rounds, U-M researchers have found a way to bring caregivers safely to the bedside.