U-Michigan launches strategic vision, pledges to be ‘the defining public university’

aerial view of U-M campus

After a year of gathering input from the campus community, the U-M administration has released its strategic vision for the next 10 years. Vision 2034 — detailed in an initial 43-page report — calls upon the University to leverage its interdisciplinarity and excellence at scale to educate learners, advance society, and make groundbreaking discoveries.

  1. Turnaround?

    After years of effort, false starts, and faulty decisions, the U.S. auto industry is remaking itself. U-M, with its historic ties to the carmakers, continues to push Detroit’s technology and policy forward.

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  2. Harder than brain surgery

    Chair of the University of Michigan’s Department of Neurosurgery, Dr. Karin Muraszko shines as both a brain surgeon and a person. In this moving video, originally produced by Michigan Television for the Big Ten Network, Dr. Muraszko describes the challenges of brain surgery, overcoming disability and sexism, and helping families face the possible loss of a child.

  3. Google's Page to speak

    Google co-founder and U-M alum Larry Page (’95) will deliver the spring 2009 commencement address.

  4. U-M and GM open $5M advanced battery research lab

    The University of Michigan and General Motors have announced an important collaboration. A five-year, $5-million award establishes the GM/U-M Advanced Battery Coalition for Drivetrains (ABCD), headquartered at U-M. Three U-M engineering professors are involved. The project will develop new battery technologies for next-generation autos.

  5. Black holes are the rhythm at the heart of galaxies

    In remarkable new findings, researchers at U-M and other institutions have found that black holes expel energy in a gentle, rhythmic pattern that helps maintain a galaxy’s equilibrium. “Just like our hearts periodically pump our circulatory systems to keep us alive, black holes give galaxies a vital warm component,” says team scientist Alexis Finoguenov.

  6. 'Fish technology' draws renewable energy from slow water currents

    A U-M engineer has made a machine that works like a fish to turn slow-moving currents into clean, renewable power. The device could be far more effective than technologies that capture energy from ocean waves and tides, because most of the world’s currents are slow moving.

The Art Show

Founded in 1990 with a single theatre workshop, the Prison Creative Arts Project (PCAP) is a program of U-M’s Residential College. Courses serve as gateways for undergraduate participation in prison arts workshops and provide academic training in issues surrounding incarceration and practical skills in the arts. The program’s Annual Exhibition of Artists in Michigan Prisons (“the art show”) is one of the largest exhibits of artwork by incarcerated artists in the world. The annual exhibition, free to the public, is presented with support from the Michigan Arts and Culture Council. It runs through April 2 at the Duderstadt Gallery. (Click on the images to enlarge. Images are courtesy of PCAP.) Learn more about PCAP.

  • “Bubblegum.” Artist: Jill Day

    PCAP exhibits bring the artwork of incarcerated artists into the public realm in order to humanize people in prison, break stereotypes, and create dialogue about mass incarceration. (View complete image.)

    Girl in bangs blows giant pink bubble until only her eyes are visible. Chartreuse background.
  • Two Fine Gentlemen. Artist: Mark Sanchez

    The 2024 exhibition features 750 works of art by 490 artists in two and three dimensions, including portraits, tattoo imagery, landscapes, fantasy, and wildlife, as well as images about incarceration and entirely new visions.

    Two dogs dressed like merry old gentlemen wearing top hats, monocles, etc.
  • Luxury Groove Bar. Artist: ꓘBurns

    “Every time I see art from this year’s exhibition, I see something new and inspiring,” says Nora Krinitsky, the Prison Creative Arts Project Project director. “Some artists use materials in ways I’ve never seen before and others are making art under some of the most difficult circumstances I can imagine.”

    Dancers enjoy funky honky tonk.
  • Days Gone. Artist: Aaron Rose

    This year’s exhibition stands out due to the increased participation of students throughout the art selection process. PCAP offered a new curation mini-course that required students to immerse themselves in the most critical aspect of the annual exhibition process: engaging with the artists directly and making informed selections of artworks for display at the annual exhibit.

    Barren landscape with a single tree
  • When Hope and Promise Fades. Artist: Christopher Levitt

    PCAP’s curatorial team staff and many students who participated in the art selection process this past fall dedicated two full days to a thematic analysis of the 750 art pieces they chose for the exhibition. (See original image.)

    Despondent man in profile hangs head
  • Be Strong. Be Safe. Be Well. Artist: Albert Krakosky III

    “Through engaging in reflective art-making and writing, the students explored and encountered both their own humanity and that of the artists,” says Emily Chase, PCAP arts programming coordinator.

    Inmate's view of dorm living.
  • Dreaming of a Way Out/Wishful Thinking. Artist: Radus

    “I marveled at the use of humor and fun that we saw across facilities this year overall,” said programming coordinator Chase. “Satire can be a way of getting through rough, hopeless, or painfully absurd moments. But it can also communicate complex ideas or states of being in a way that is both accessible and clever.” This year, organizers are emphasizing storytelling and artists’ voices in the gallery in an audio tour.

    Pastel watercolor of alien abduction as unicorn watches
  • King’s Gambit. Artist: Marte’nez Sr.

    The free exhibition runs through April 2 at the Duderstadt Gallery, 2281 Bonisteel Blvd., on U-M’s North Campus in Ann Arbor. Gallery hours are Noon-6 p.m. Sunday and Monday; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

    Older gentleman behind bars plays chess with child. Reddish brown