Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Education & Society

  1. Riot? Or massacre?

    Repost: Words matter, says Maggie Yar, BA ’95, executive director of Tulsa’s Hille Foundation. Especially when it comes to the little-known story of the 1921 Race Massacre – formerly known as the 1921 Race Riot – in which the city’s ‘Black Wall Street’ was destroyed.

  2. Medical students drive development of new pandemic course

    Students will explore various aspects of pandemic response using COVID-19 as a case study, from the history of pandemics; disaster response from the federal down to the local and institutional levels; and health inequities, among other topics.

  3. Helping, learning in Kenya

    In the weeks before COVID-19 struck the East African country, 30 U-M students from dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and engineering set out to improve overall well-being in underserved communities. They tackled everything from harvesting organic coffee to providing sex education.

  4. Everyone vs. COVID-19: U-M scientists need public’s help

    Signing up for U-M registry will make it easy for researchers to find sick, recovered, at-risk, and healthy people for dozens of studies. The goal is to understand, prevent, treat, and measure COVID-19’s effects on people and society.

  5. Committees to prepare for fall ’20 semester amid COVID-19

    Seven coordinated committees will tackle different aspects of academic and campus planning, from instructional planning to the use of academic spaces and libraries.

  6. M-Response Corps faces down crisis

    Their formal education took a detour this spring, so Michigan Medicine students are supporting health care staff and patients through the current pandemic.

  7. The idea to ‘flatten the curve’

    Decades of studying pandemics and how to curb them led a U-M physician-historian to coin a term the rest of us now use in daily conversation.

  8. Feeling stressed? Take a ‘nature pill’

    Spending just 20 minutes in nature — even if it’s simply gardening, doing yardwork or sitting quietly in the backyard — can significantly lower stress hormone levels.

  9. U-M students share their ‘new normal’

    As COVID-19 disrupts university life, pockets of positivity and optimism have emerged, illuminating now more than ever students’ support of each other, and faculty commitment to their education.