Education & Society

  1. The suicide rate among female nurses is shocking

    The 3 million nurses working in the U.S. today comprise the country’s largest health-care workforce — 85 percent of whom are women. They are twice as likely to die by suicide than the general female population, and 70 percent more likely than female physicians.

  2. Fourth-generation grad for the Balogh family

    The Wolverine blood runs strong in this Michigan clan, whose newest alum, Amanda Balogh, BS, is the 14th member of the family to attend U-M. The pioneer was her great-grandmother Helen Cortade, who received a Michigan master’s degree in the 1920s.

  3. Stamps students bring art projects to families at home

    Stamps students in Melanie Manos’ ‘Detroit Connections: In the Classroom’ course created ways to inspire kids with creative activities and remote art education throughout the pandemic.

  4. State House proposal would slash budget for Ann Arbor campus

    A Michigan House committee moved forward a higher-education budget bill May 5 that would radically change state-funding for U-M Ann Arbor, including a loss of some $40M in the next fiscal year.

  5. Detroit: Olympic city?

    The fate of the delayed 2020 Tokyo Olympic Game seems more uncertain than ever due to the pandemic. Detroit has long sought to host the games. Will it ever happen?

  6. People gave up on flu pandemic measures a century ago – and paid a price

    The deadly third wave of the 1918 flu shows what can happen when society prematurely returns to pre-pandemic life, a medical historian cautions.

  7. Toddler with spina bifida meets paralympian: “She has crutches like me”

    A young patient’s reaction to a commercial featuring gold medalist and double amputee Jessica Long goes viral, leads to a Zoom introduction.

  8. Who has a right to ask if you’re vaccinated?

    Why a false controversy about vaccine privacy and “passports” threatens to prolong the pandemic.

  9. How countries on five continents may shape future of health policy via pandemic

    Russian author Tolstoy once wrote, “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” That sentiment can be applied to countries’ responses to COVID-19, say U-M researchers.