Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Environment

  1. ‘We’re missing something fundamental about the sun’

    First data from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission has implications for space weather prediction and Earth’s power grid.

  2. Meet me at Camp Davis

    Since 1929, students of earth and environmental sciences have convened at U-M’s Camp Davis in Wyoming. A recent reunion inspired some heated (but friendly) debate.

  3. Apple and U-M collaborate on sound study

    Scientists have long grappled with measuring the impact of noise exposure on humans. U-M has partnered with Apple to use a person’s iPhone and Apple Watch to generate a more holistic overview.

  4. Michigan cities, groups that will bear brunt of climate change effects

    Study shows most cities in Michigan will be dealing with harsh consequences of climate change, and vulnerable groups who are disproportionately affected by it will continue to do so now and into the future.

  5. Turning Great Lakes plastic into clothing

    A 19-year-old U-M student is founder of the first company to use 100 percent U.S. plastic to produce clothes. His ambition is to shift the fashion industry and help preserve the coast of Lake Michigan.

  6. Pool parasite causing panic

    Cryptosporidiosis outbreaks are on the rise, and children are likely to be dispersing the illness. Crypto often enters the body by swallowing pool water. U-M experts weigh in on how to prevent spreading this parasite.

  7. From trash talk to legislation

    In 1976, three student activists walked across the state, collecting rubbish and publicizing ‘Proposal A.’ They succeeded in passing a radical initiative to recycle aluminum cans and glass bottles, transforming Michigan’s landscape.

  8. Creature feature

    U-M biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards, and small mammals. Beware: It’s the stuff of nightmares. For real.

  9. Countdown to catastrophe

    The pace of today’s global warming outstrips any climate event since the extinction of the dinosaurs, and experts predict by 2158 carbon could reach levels not seen for 56 million years.