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Research News

  1. Guilty pleasure? Don't worry about it

    Most people seem to need a justification for making an indulgent or luxurious purchase. But new U-M research finds that, with or without a reason, people tend to enjoy that guilty pleasure…well, without guilt. The take-away? Indulging yourself may or may not be healthy, but if you’re going to do it, don’t worry about finding a justification. Just enjoy.

  2. Exonerations correct only a small fraction of false convictions

    Among defendants sentenced to death in the United States since 1973, at least 2.3 percent — and possibly more — were falsely convicted. So says a study co-authored by U-M law professor Samuel Gross.

  3. Vets and depression: Returning from war to fight new battle

    Nearly a third of veterans treated at Veterans Affairs health care centers have significant depressive symptoms, and about 13 percent have clinically diagnosed depression. Depression is bad enough; it’s also a serious risk factor for suicide. plus video

  4. Risks of heavy snoring

    Chronic snoring could be a symptom of sleep apnea, which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. plus video

  5. Early whales gave birth on land, fossil find reveals

    Two newly described fossil whales—a pregnant female and a male of the same species—reveal how primitive whales gave birth and provide new insights into how whales made the transition from land to sea. (plus video)

  6. Get smarter!

    Environmental conditions are much more powerful than genetic influences in determining intelligence, says U-M social psychologist Richard Nisbett: “Believing that intelligence is under your control—and having parents who demand achievement—can do wonders.”

    Related:

  7. Smart bridges under development with new federal grant

    A year and a half after the I-35 bridge collapse in Minneapolis, and with a new national emphasis on rebuilding infrastructure, U-M is leading a new project to engineer smart bridges that can thoroughly discuss their health with inspectors.

  8. Take a hike

    Going outside, even in the cold, improves memory and attention.

  9. Six new genes suggest obesity is in your head, not your gut

    Is obesity all in your head? New research by an international team co-led by U-M suggests that genes that predispose people to obesity act in the brain — not on metabolic functions such as fat storage — and that perhaps some people are simply hardwired to overeat.