Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Research News

  1. Are men hard-wired to overspend?

    The antique cliche says that wives rush out to spend their husbands’ hard-earned money. A new study suggests that the opposite is probably true: men seem to have evolved to spend, spend, spend when they’re looking for mates. In fact, the more sexual partners a man desires, the more likely he is to empty his wallet.

  2. Shade coffee benefits more than birds

    Here’s one more reason to say “shade grown, please” when you order your morning cup of coffee. Shade coffee farms, which grow coffee under a canopy of multiple tree species, not only harbor native birds, bats and other beneficial creatures, but also maintain genetic diversity of native tree species and can act as focal points for tropical forest regeneration.

  3. Male and female shopping strategies show evolution at work in the mall

    Male and female shopping styles are in our genes—and we can look to evolution for the reason. Daniel Kruger, research faculty at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, says it’s perfectly natural that men often can’t distinguish a sage sock from a beige sock or that sometimes women can’t tell if the shoe Read more

  4. Black holes are the rhythm at the heart of galaxies

    In remarkable new findings, researchers at U-M and other institutions have found that black holes expel energy in a gentle, rhythmic pattern that helps maintain a galaxy’s equilibrium. “Just like our hearts periodically pump our circulatory systems to keep us alive, black holes give galaxies a vital warm component,” says team scientist Alexis Finoguenov.

  5. Old as you want to be

    Older people tend to feel about 13 years younger than their chronological age, and in general they are satisfied with the aging process. Research by U-M psychologist Jacqui Smith also reveals that people who feel younger live longer than those who don’t.

  6. Exactly how much housework does a husband create?

    Having a husband creates an extra seven hours a week of housework for women, according to a U-M study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. families. For men, the picture is very different: A wife saves men from about an hour of housework a week.

  7. Sensors for bat-inspired spy plane under development

    A six-inch robotic spy plane modeled after a bat would gather data from sights, sounds and smells in urban combat zones and transmit information back to a soldier in real time. That’s the Army’s concept, and it has awarded the University of Michigan College of Engineering a five-year, $10-million grant to help make it happen.

  8. Medicine and ministry

    Dr. Oveta Fuller is a respected researcher in microbiology and immunology, an expert on viral infections. But her most vital work takes place outside the lab, when she combines her scientific knowledge with faith. Turns out that one of her most effective weapons against AIDS is the fact that she’s not only a scientist, but a pastor.

  9. Informal support may protect blacks with mental disorders

    Blacks with mental disorders often find comfort from their family and friends, but this support may result in them avoiding professional help. U-M’s Robert Taylor says his study suggests “the presence of a strong social fabric that may buffer individuals from mental health problems.”