Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Research News

  1. Older Americans: How they are faring in the recession

    Older Americans have weathered the financial crisis relatively well, although many now expect to work longer than they did just a year ago, according to a University of Michigan study.

  2. Living together: The best way to divorce-proof a marriage?

    Maybe. Maybe not. But one thing’s certain: young people who do live together think it’s the best way to head off divorce later.

  3. Water quality improves after lawn fertilizer ban, study shows

    In an effort to keep lakes and streams clean, municipalities around the country are banning or restricting the use of phosphorus-containing lawn fertilizers, which can kill fish and cause smelly algae blooms and other problems when the phosphorus washes out of the soil and into waterways.

  4. Educate yourself to boost achievement in kids

    “If you want your kids to do well in school, then the amount of education you get yourself is important,” said U-M’s Pamela Davis-Kean.

  5. Smartphone app by U-M students promotes good deeds

    Beautify your world. Leave an inspirational message in a public place. Connect with a family member. Those are just a few of the proposed acts of kindness pushed out to users of a new smartphone application developed by University of Michigan students.

  6. Playing video games for better, not worse

    Some video games can make children kinder and more likely to help—not hurt—other people.

  7. Why dishing does you good

    How come dishing with a girlfriend does wonders for a woman’s mood?

  8. What to expect of the flu

    H1N1 (swine) flu isn’t gone yet. Here are tips from U-M’s health system for dealing with it when flu season starts again in the fall.

  9. Chemicals in common consumer products may play a role in pre-term births

    A group of common environmental contaminants called phthalates, which are present in many industrial and consumer products including everyday personal care items, may contribute to the country’s alarming rise in premature births.