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Research News

  1. Scientist models the mysterious travels of greenhouse gas

    The global travel logs of greenhouse gases are based on atmospheric sampling locations sprinkled over the Earth and short towers that measure the uptake or release of carbon from a small patch of forest. But those measurements don’t agree with current computer models of how plants and soils behave. A University of Michigan researcher is developing a unique way to reconcile these crucial data.

  2. Guilty pleasure? Don't worry about it

    Most people seem to need a justification for making an indulgent or luxurious purchase. But new U-M research finds that, with or without a reason, people tend to enjoy that guilty pleasure…well, without guilt. The take-away? Indulging yourself may or may not be healthy, but if you’re going to do it, don’t worry about finding a justification. Just enjoy.

  3. Number of fast-food restaurants associated with stroke risk

    U-M physicians have discovered a connection between the number of fast-food joints in a neighborhood and the rate of stroke. It’s not known yet whether the restaurants are a cause of stroke, or just a marker of an unhealthy area.

  4. Cell phones as classroom computers

    Educational software for cell phones, a suite of tools developed at the University of Michigan, is being used to turn smart phones into personal computers for students in two Texas classrooms. (watch) En Espanol

  5. 'USA Learns' helps immigrants learn English

    A new Web site that teaches English to Spanish-speaking immigrants has attracted more than 500,000 visitors in its first three months of operation. (watch)

  6. Violent media numb viewers to the pain of others

    Violent video games and movies make people numb to the pain and suffering of others, says a study co-authored by U-M’s Brad Bushman. “People exposed to media violence are less helpful to others in need because they are ‘comfortably numb’ to the pain and suffering of others,” he says. En Espanol

    Podcast: Researcher Brad Bushman describes his findings (listen)

  7. Exonerations correct only a small fraction of false convictions

    Among defendants sentenced to death in the United States since 1973, at least 2.3 percent — and possibly more — were falsely convicted. So says a study co-authored by U-M law professor Samuel Gross.

  8. Vets and depression: Returning from war to fight new battle

    Nearly a third of veterans treated at Veterans Affairs health care centers have significant depressive symptoms, and about 13 percent have clinically diagnosed depression. Depression is bad enough; it’s also a serious risk factor for suicide. plus video

  9. Risks of heavy snoring

    Chronic snoring could be a symptom of sleep apnea, which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. plus video