1. U-M and GM open $5M advanced battery research lab

    The University of Michigan and General Motors have announced an important collaboration. A five-year, $5-million award establishes the GM/U-M Advanced Battery Coalition for Drivetrains (ABCD), headquartered at U-M. Three U-M engineering professors are involved. The project will develop new battery technologies for next-generation autos.

  2. Black holes are the rhythm at the heart of galaxies

    In remarkable new findings, researchers at U-M and other institutions have found that black holes expel energy in a gentle, rhythmic pattern that helps maintain a galaxy’s equilibrium. “Just like our hearts periodically pump our circulatory systems to keep us alive, black holes give galaxies a vital warm component,” says team scientist Alexis Finoguenov.

  3. 'Fish technology' draws renewable energy from slow water currents

    A U-M engineer has made a machine that works like a fish to turn slow-moving currents into clean, renewable power. The device could be far more effective than technologies that capture energy from ocean waves and tides, because most of the world’s currents are slow moving.

  4. Old as you want to be

    Older people tend to feel about 13 years younger than their chronological age, and in general they are satisfied with the aging process. Research by U-M psychologist Jacqui Smith also reveals that people who feel younger live longer than those who don’t.

  5. Violence and values in the Middle East: Lebanon survey

    As fighting continues in Gaza, a U-M survey of nearby Lebanon illuminates some of the values underlying the use of violence in the Middle East. The findings are likely to surprise people on all sides of the political spectrum.

  6. Are men hard-wired to overspend?

    The antique cliche says that wives rush out to spend their husbands’ hard-earned money. A new study suggests that the opposite is probably true: men seem to have evolved to spend, spend, spend when they’re looking for mates. In fact, the more sexual partners a man desires, the more likely he is to empty his wallet.