Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Education & Society

  1. A life worth living, part two

    Video: What are the connections between happiness, creativity and resilience? How do you overcome obstacles to build a satisfying life? U-M psychology professor Christopher Peterson has some deceptively simple — but not necessarily easy — answers.

  2. The dean of network news

    As president of ABC News, U-M alumnus David Westin is one of the most important figures in TV news. It’s a long way from a childhood in Flint and Ann Arbor.

  3. Mother-in-law day?

    They often get a bad rap, but in-laws can be a woman’s best friend.

    Plus: Americans live surprisingly close to their mothers

  4. The quintessential correspondent

    30 years ago, reporter Tony Collings took a chance on a job with a brand new TV network called CNN. Now on the U-M faculty, he looks back at a time when 24/7 news seemed nutty.

  5. DoGood movement grows: Student iPhone app acquired by national company

    The popular DoGood iPhone application developed by U-M students last year has been acquired by Tonic, a digital media company. It’s the latest of dozens of inventions by U-M students and faculty that are transforming the Michigan and national economies.

  6. U-M law clinic frees another innocent man

    The Law School’s Innocence Clinic secures the freedom of a man falsely imprisoned for murder since 2001.

  7. Teens experience engineering at U-M Detroit Center

    More than 100 high school students from across the city are building robots in the University of Michigan Detroit Center, thanks to the Michigan Engineering Zone.

  8. A life on the edge

    Journalist and U-M alumnus Frank Viviano has covered war and conflict around the world. Now living at a slower pace in Italy, his combination of experience and distance give him a uniquely informed perspective on world events—and how to live during these times of crisis.

  9. Informal support may protect blacks with mental disorders

    Blacks with mental disorders often find comfort from their family and friends, but this support may result in them avoiding professional help. U-M’s Robert Taylor says his study suggests “the presence of a strong social fabric that may buffer individuals from mental health problems.”