Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Arts & Culture

  1. Dancing with Madonna

    In 1977, Whitley Hill arrived as a freshman at U-M and met her roommate: a talented, eccentric dynamo named Madonna. Hill’s new book remembers the girl who would become an icon.

  2. Good-bye, Borders

    The Ann Arbor – based bookseller is bankrupt, all its stores closing. But in its heyday, there were few places closer to a literary heart.

  3. Back to basics in the kitchen and garden

    Seems more people are interested in eating fresh, healthy foods. An alumnus and his co-author wife, who have built their own “farmstead” offer tips to get you started on the healthy, do-a-little-bit-more-yourself lifestyle.

  4. Learning from a legend

    How does a performer lift herself to world-class status? And how can she help students create real art? Geri Allen, inheritor of Detroit’s great piano traditions and one of the world’s great pianists, offers the secrets to her students at U-M.

  5. Michigan’s national poets

    A new anthology of US poets laureate gathers the best poems of some of America’s best poets. Among them: four geniuses who taught at U-M.

  6. StarKids!

    Their story sounds like something from Broadway: talented students create a funny, larky musical about a child wizard, and perform it in a campus basement. Videos go viral, there’s a sequel, international acclaim. One member lands a role on “Glee.” How did it happen?

  7. U-M poet named one of best in generation

    Acclaimed poet, teacher and translator Khaled Mattawa has been awarded a United States Artist Fellowship for 2010. The Academy of American Poets called Mattawa “one of the most original, lyrical and intellectually challenging poets of his generation.”

  8. The Doors' disaster at Michigan

    Jim Morrison bombs at the homecoming dance –- and changes rock history.

  9. The last survivors

    Even the youngest Holocaust survivors, like Dr. Emanuel Tanay, are reaching their 80s. What does it mean to have lived, and to remain a witness to one of history’s great atrocities?