Office of the VP for Communications – Keeping alumni and friends connected to U-M

Business and Economy

  1. Recipe for success

    Savorfull CEO Stacy Goldberg, RN ’97/MPH ’99, is on a mission. She wants to prove that “free-from” foods can taste good. That’s welcome news to people who must avoid common allergens.

  2. Hatching a (business) plan

    Alumni siblings Andy and Emily Linn are feathering their family business with camaraderie and creativity in Detroit’s Cass Corridor.

  3. Reinventing the wheel

    Founders of tech startup Are You a Human could have set up shop anywhere—and they chose Detroit. Based in the historic Madison Building, they embody new momentum in the city.

  4. Student startup scores spot with national incubator

    Fetchnotes, founded by a team of U-M undergrads, is an innovative new cloud-based system that lets users organize information via phone, smartphone app, desktop widget, or web browser.

  5. Rebranding fundraising as fun

    It’s one thing to build a cool brand, says CrowdRise co-founder Robert Wolfe. But it’s even better to build a cool brand about giving back.

  6. Ross School brings Executive MBA to sunny SoCal

    Business professor-cum-shark diver George Siedel will teach the LA cohort of the Executive MBA Program this fall.

  7. The path to economic recovery will be a marathon, not a sprint

    “The unemployment rate begins to creep down but remains uncomfortably high even at the end of 2013—four-and-a-half years after the official end of the recession,” says U-M’s Joan Crary.

  8. U-M to invest in its own startup businesses

    The university could inject up to $25 million during the next decade into select venture-funded U-M startups—new companies built around inventions born in faculty members’ labs.

  9. Bailed-out banks issued riskier loans

    Banks that received federal bailout money ended up approving riskier loans and shifting capital toward risky investments after getting government help, say U-M researchers. Further, these banks were no more likely to issue loans, overall, than non-TARP banks, in contrast to the declared objective of the federal program to increase lending.