A new weapon against HIV

Researchers have discovered an antibiotic molecule that enables the immune system to kill HIV-infected cells. Now the quest begins to optimize the compound and move closer to a viable therapy.

  1. Male and female shopping strategies show evolution at work in the mall

    Male and female shopping styles are in our genes—and we can look to evolution for the reason. Daniel Kruger, research faculty at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, says it’s perfectly natural that men often can’t distinguish a sage sock from a beige sock or that sometimes women can’t tell if the shoe Read more

  2. Black holes are the rhythm at the heart of galaxies

    In remarkable new findings, researchers at U-M and other institutions have found that black holes expel energy in a gentle, rhythmic pattern that helps maintain a galaxy’s equilibrium. “Just like our hearts periodically pump our circulatory systems to keep us alive, black holes give galaxies a vital warm component,” says team scientist Alexis Finoguenov.

  3. 'Fish technology' draws renewable energy from slow water currents

    A U-M engineer has made a machine that works like a fish to turn slow-moving currents into clean, renewable power. The device could be far more effective than technologies that capture energy from ocean waves and tides, because most of the world’s currents are slow moving.

  4. J-Hop

    For almost 80 years, until 1960, J-Hop highlighted the U-M social calendar. The dance gathered the entire student body — and some controversy, like when the 1913 event included the Tango.

  5. The late, great 98

    Tom Harmon may have been the best college football player ever. His single-handed destruction of Ohio State is the stuff of gridiron legend. But his exploits as a pilot during World War Two made him a hero not just in a game, but in life.

  6. Hail Satan!

    When students come to the university, they face a new world that can shake up their whole way of life. Some fear that even their religious faith will be under siege. But surveys – and students themselves, like Lizzy Lovinger (right) – say that keeping the faith is both a challenge and a blessing.